01. 04. 2022 Benjamin Gröber Downloads / Release Notes, NetEye, Unified Monitoring

NetEye 4.23 Release Notes

Welcome to version 4.23 of our NetEye v4 Unified Monitoring Solution.

In the last two months, NetEye travelled from the western side of South Tyrol to eastern side, reaching the beautiful Lake Landro, located at more than 1,400 meters a.s.l. in the eponymous valley, near the municipality of Toblach/Dobbiaco. The lake is positioned between two well-known natural parks, the Sesto Dolomites and the Fanes-Sennes-Braies parks, and with its characteristic turquoise color offers a unique mirroring of the beautiful surrounding mountain ranges.

OS Updates

Since its beginnings NetEye proudly invested and believed in Open Source Software. Throughout the years NetEye built its foundations on the Open Source model and actively promoted it by participating to international events (FOSDEM, InfluxDays, ntopConf, OSMC, GrafanaCon) also giving speech, as well as organizing and sponsoring world-wide conferences (Icinga Camp, SFSCON).

Moreover, NetEye integrates several Open Source Software like InfluxDB, Grafana, ntop, Icinga 2 and many more; develops Open Source Software like Tornado and strives to build a Community by promoting a NetEye User Group.

NetEye is proud to maintain this commitment and strengthens its presence in the Enterprise Open Source Software market, thanks to a partnership with the leading Open Source company Red Hat. In fact, with the 4.23 release NetEye reaches an important milestone in its history, and is deployed on top of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL 8), instead of CentOS 7.

Indeed, in the last development cycle, the efforts of the NetEye team were completely focused on this improvement and, to allow for a smooth transition to the new OS, the NetEye 4.23 release is unique in that for the first and only time, no new functionalities have been introduced. The rationale for this decision is that the breaking changes in this release only concern the new OS and its dependencies, allowing to better monitor the migration process and isolate any possible issue in the new NetEye environment.

Furthermore, the migration to the new OS allows us to benefit from the features, updates, support, and utilities provided by Red Hat and pass that onto our clients. A full overview of the new architecture is available in the dedicated section of the User Guide.

Before starting the upgrade procedure, fully described in details in the User Guide, please contact Würth Phoenix through the official channel: sales, consultant or support portal for further information on the process.

Monitoring – Detection

The standard way to monitor systems is installing an Icinga2 agent. The Icinga2 agent on NetEye repositories provides NetEye specific features, in addition to the standard Icinga2 agent feature set. There are two new Icinga2 agents for Debian “bullseye” and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15.3, which are now generally available on our repositories.

References

Should you be interested to discover more about NetEye feel free to explore our Online User Guide.

Benjamin Gröber

Benjamin Gröber

R&D Software Architect at Wuerth Phoenix
Hi, my name is Benjamin, and I'm Software Architect in the Research & Development Team of the "IT System & Service Management Solutions" Business Unit of Würth Phoenix. I discovered my passion for Computers and Technology when I was 7 and got my first PC. Just using computers and playing games was never enough for me, so just a few months later, started learning Visual Basic and entered the world of Software Development. Since then, my passion is keeping up with the short-lived, fast-paced, ever-evolving IT world and exploring new technologies, eventually trying to put them to good use. I'm a strong advocate for writing maintainable software, and lately I'm investing most of my free time in the exploration of the emerging Rust programming language.

Author

Benjamin Gröber

Hi, my name is Benjamin, and I'm Software Architect in the Research & Development Team of the "IT System & Service Management Solutions" Business Unit of Würth Phoenix. I discovered my passion for Computers and Technology when I was 7 and got my first PC. Just using computers and playing games was never enough for me, so just a few months later, started learning Visual Basic and entered the world of Software Development. Since then, my passion is keeping up with the short-lived, fast-paced, ever-evolving IT world and exploring new technologies, eventually trying to put them to good use. I'm a strong advocate for writing maintainable software, and lately I'm investing most of my free time in the exploration of the emerging Rust programming language.

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